Educational Videos

  FAF Educational Section
Part 1 - FAF Innovations
In part #1 of this 14 part series, Dr. Ben Szirth, Ph.D. introduces some of the features inherent in the Canon CX-1 Digital Mydriatic/Non-Mydriatic Retinal Camera and the CR-2 PLUS AF Digital Non-Mydriatic Retinal Camera. His discussion includes an overview of lipofuscin, Canon fundus autofluorescence (FAF) technology, fluorescein angiography, and the Canon red, green and blue optical filter channel system included within.
Part 2 - Emboss
In part #2 of this 14 part series, Dr. Ben Szirth, Ph.D. introduces the Canon Emboss feature. His discussion includes how to best use the Emboss tool and how this technology may be used to improve the diagnosis and monitoring of such things as branch vein occlusions.
Part 3 - Fundus Auto Fluorescence
In part #3 of this 14 part series, Dr. Ben Szirth, Ph.D. discusses what lipofuscin is, where lipofuscin resides, and how to identify its existence. He then provides an overview of Canon autofluorescence (FAF) technology and highlights some of the differences between the Company's FAF technology and traditional fluorescein angiography. He concludes with a brief discussion that highlights the diagnostic power of FAF vis-a-vis fluorescein angiography.
Part 4 - Healthy Eye With Diabetes
In part #4 of this 14 part series, Dr. Ben Szirth, Ph.D. examines a young child with early type 1 diabetes. In his analysis, he looks for early signs of neovascular change and calls specific attention to the level of hypo-fluorescence using Canon autofluorescence (FAF) technology around the optic nerve and surrounding blood vessels.
Part 5 - Patient with RPE Damage
In part #5 of this 14 part series, Dr. Ben Szirth, Ph.D. reviews a patient with RPE damage. In his examination, he uses Canon monochromatic, red and green channel views along with the system's Emboss and Color Emboss tools. He uses Canon fundus autofluorescence (FAF) technology to locate the areas of damage and how the technology can help to better predict both the path of deterioration and the speed of the predicted rate of progression. Dr. Szirth then discusses Canon color emboss technology and how it can be used to improve his view of the lipofuscin present and to better predict areas of impending change.
Part 6 - Pinguecula
In part #6 of this 14 part series, Dr. Ben Szirth, Ph.D. discusses how Canon autofluorescence (FAF) technology can be used to help to differentiate between a Pinguecula and a Pterygium.
Part 7 - Dry AMD
In part #7 of this 14 part series, Dr. Ben Szirth, Ph.D. evaluates a patient known to have Dry AMD. In his analysis, he uses the monochromatic view with Canon Emboss technology to help define the amount of retinal deterioration present. He also discusses his use of the Canon red channel filter to assess the relative level of damage to the choroid. In his examination, he uses Canon fundus autofluorescence (FAF) technology and talks about how the areas of hypo-fluorescence and hyper-fluorescence can be used to help determine the state of the disease and its likely level of progression. Dr. Szirth concludes with brief discussion Canon fundus autofluorescence (FAF) technology and the diagnostic advantage the relative value of gray scale image provides over CSLO systems that average-away details inherent in the signal image.
Part 8 - How Much Treatment?
In part #8 of this 14 part series, Dr. Ben Szirth, Ph.D. reviews a patient with significant laser treatment. In his analysis, he uses Canon's monochromatic view with Emboss technology to enhance the image in order to better evaluate the depth of the various laser treatment areas.
Part 9 - Diabetic Retinopathy
In part #9 of this 14 part series, Dr. Ben Szirth, Ph.D. discusses the use of Canon's fundus autofluorescence (FAF technology) with retroillumination and how it can be used to see small microvascular changes typically unobservable with color imaging or direct ophthalmoscopy.
Part 10 - Branch Vein Occlusion
In part #10 of this 14 part series, Dr. Ben Szirth, Ph.D. discusses how Canon's autofluorescence (FAF) technology can be used to best determine if there is tissue damage. In this case, the highlighted areas in the FAF image are used to justify proceeding with a fluorescein angiography.
Part 11 - Macular Hole Silicone
In part #11 of this 14 part series, Dr. Ben Szirth, Ph.D. examines a case where he is looking for a macular hole in a patient that has undergone a previous vitrectomy. When Canon autofluorescence (FAF) technology is introduced, the silicone shadows and reflexes disappear and the macular hole is now very nicely highlighted.
Part 12 - Color RGB Isolation
In part #12 of this 14 part series, Dr. Ben Szirth, Ph.D. discusses the diagnostic value that each specific Canon R-G-B filter provides. He discusses how the Red channel with the Emboss technology helps guide the doctor towards the use of the autofluorescence (FAF) technology which, in turn, shows specific areas of leakage in the macula. This example clearly demonstrates how Canon FAF technology helps obviate the need for a Fluorescein Angiography.
Part 13 - Wet AMD
In part #13 of this 14 part series, Dr. Ben Szirth, Ph.D. looks at a Wet AMD case and discusses the incremental value provided when using Canon autofluorescence (FAF) technology over traditional fluorescein angiography by providing a much deeper look into the choroid. Patient case examples are provided.
Part 14 - Geographic Atrophy
In part #14 of this 14 part series, Dr. Ben Szirth, Ph.D. discusses "banding." He compares two eyes: one with "banding" and the other without. In his analysis, Dr. Szirth talks about how he evaluates the presence of hyperfluorescence and how he then uses it to determine both the direction and the rate of future vision loss.